Tag Archives: book review

Paper Towns

papertowns     
With the John Green fad going on, what better book to review, than Paper Towns?
This is my third John Green book, and to be honest, the plot was very similar to Looking For Alaska. A not-very-interesting boy, who falls in love with a wild girl, who’s all mysterious and full of this enthralling energy.
I certainly do love the way Green introduces his characters.  He even brings out their personalities very well. Just as his novels are, even Paper Towns is full of funny conversations, witty comebacks, lots of (slightly pretentious) metaphors.
Quentin Jacobsen has been love with his neighbor Margo Roth Spiegelman since forever. As children, they always hung out together, but as High School happened, Margo broke all communication with Quentin, whose thoughts still revolved around Margo.
Margo was a mystery to everyone, even to her best friends.
“Maybe she loved mysteries so much, that she became one.” See? I absolutely love John Green’s quotes. (Yes, I can be VERY cheezy, but nevermind that)
Margo is full of wanderlust, she wants to tour the world, unravel new places, new mysteries. She was care-free. She never revealed her true self to anybody, until one night she turned up at Quentin’s window and took him on the most adventurous trip he had ever had. It was the first time she revealed a small bit of her true self to someone.
But the next day in school, Margo once again has become a mystery, a girl Quentin once knew.
The beginning of the book is beautiful, somewhere in the middle it gets a little dragged, and the ending? I think the ending, even though it was kind of an anti-climax, stayed true to all the characters, it was realistic.
All together, I didn’t LOVE the book, neither did I hate it. It was a nice book, John Green’s humor, and his quotes/slightly-pretentious-metaphors being the highlight. The book certainly does get you thinking about a lot of things.

“I’m starting to realize that people lack good mirrors. It’s so hard for anyone to show us how we look, & so hard for us to show anyone how we feel.” –John Green, Paper Towns.

Matilda

Matilda               
Author: Roald Dahl.

Once again, a MUST READ for literally any age group.
Matilda looks like any other young girl, but has almost unrealistic intellectual capabilities. That’s what attracts you to her. She’s the kind that enjoys classics at the age of three- and what’s more, taught herself the English language at three! She’s a gifted child.

But what stinks for her, is that her parents are the MOST self-absorbed, egocentric, conceited, sexist human beings you will ever come across. So self-absorbed that they don’t realize their little one is a genius. Matilda has strong feelings of hatred for her dull-witted family. Their IQ levels simply do not match.

At school, another challenge awaits her. The beastly Mrs. Trunchbull. Not sure whether to call her a headmistress or a monster. She once made a boy eat an entire chocolate cake in front of the entire school, because he stole some of hers. She also spun a girl by her pigtails, for wearing pigtails to school.
But Matilda also has the most affectionate class teacher, who is her escape from the horrid world. She also happens to be in a very bad situation, but Matilda comes to her rescue.
In the end, sweet revenge is taken. I won’t tell on whom, but it surely was comical.

Roald Dahl’s style is different from the other authors, he can crack you up in a second. He was, and maybe even IS my favorite author. You can never grow weary of him, ever. He’s a master of children’s books.

“It’s a funny thing about mothers and fathers. Even when their own child is the most disgusting little blister you could ever imagine, they still think that he or she is wonderful.” – Roald DahlMatilda.

The Princess Diaries

TPD
Buy the entire bookset at a GREAT price:      

Buy the first book/other combinations:          
Author: Meg Cabot.
The Princess Diaries was one of my favorites as a 7th grader. It is perfect for teenage girls, and even older, if you like cute, girly books. It’s almost like a chick-flick in the form of a book. In fact The Princess Diaries also has a bunch of movies!

Mia Thermopolis (I love her name, for no reason in particular), is a normal teenager, living with her inferiority complexes and insecurities, when she discovers that she actually is a princess. How fairy-tale like, right? But fairy tales always make you happy (make me happy, atleast) and revive your girly, I-want-to-be-a-princess-some-day side.
Her transformation from a shabby, under-confident teenager, to a gorgeous, dignified, but humble princess is beautiful, and Meg Cabot has a very humorous style.  Mia’s grandmother trains her in the ways of a princess, and oozes charm.

There are many books in this series, each with a very interesting story. Mia eventually falls in love, and there is also an aspect of romance in the later books.
It all makes for a perfect fairy tale story with a  happy ending, and every one lives happily ever after. (See what I did there?)

This is a must read for teenagers! Highly recommend. I’d always read this in the library periods in school.